featured11 464x290 - Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out
Alcohol Addiction Sobriety

Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out

Sobriety is a continuous struggle. It’s not something that you attain one day and then the rest of your life goes smoothly—hardly the case. Instead, sobriety is something that you need to work at every single day. For a lot of us, this can be quite the challenge which is why it would be important […]

featured10 322x230 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

featured9 322x230 - Withdrawal Symptoms: Some Few Symptoms You Should Expect

Withdrawal Symptoms: Some Few Symptoms You Should Expect

featured8 322x230 - What You Affect: Four Common Health Issues Attributed to Alcoholism

What You Affect: Four Common Health Issues Attributed to Alcoholism

featured6 322x230 - The Power of Therapy: Why Family Members of Alcoholics Need It

The Power of Therapy: Why Family Members of Alcoholics Need It

featured2 - Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue
Alcohol Addiction Help

Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue

Once you have come to terms with the fact that there is a problem in your life, now would be the time to find the help that you need. Today, let’s look at some of the common options that alcoholics can pursue. Rehabilitation Centers This is, without a doubt, the most well-known option for those […]

featured1 - The Hard Truth: Common Signs That You Have an Alcohol Problem
Alcohol Addiction Signs

The Hard Truth: Common Signs That You Have an Alcohol Problem

Addiction is never an easy topic to broach. However, knowing that there is a problem at hand is one of the first steps in the right direction toward recovery. Today, we’ll look at common signs that an alcohol problem exists in your life. Knowing the signs and fully acknowledging them is one of the key […]

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featured11 - Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out
Alcohol Addiction Sobriety

Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out

Sobriety is a continuous struggle. It’s not something that you attain one day and then the rest of your life goes smoothly—hardly the case. Instead, sobriety is something that you need to work at every single day. For a lot of us, this can be quite the challenge which is why it would be important to arm yourself with some ideas on the sort of activities that you can do.

Here are some activities that several of us personally do:

Exercise

41 - Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out

One of the primary reasons why decided to go sober was the fact that our health was severely impacted by bad habits. Health is not something that you can just throw money at in order to be on the right side of it. It is something that you will need to actually put in a lot of blood, sweat, and tears for.

Exercising helps to get the body back to its natural healthy state. It keeps the mind clear and keeps recovering alcoholics busy with something productive. Exercise not only keeps you mentally and physically healthy but it also helps with your confidence and self-worth.

Arts

42 - Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out

The artistic pursuits of many have been fueled by personal tragedy and pain. Arts do not just refer to painting or sculpting. The arts refer to a wide spectrum of activities like:

Dance

Dance is a double whammy for us since it not only gives you a work out but it’s a pretty good way to channel your struggles into healthy representation and release.

Writing

Some of the best memoirs we’ve read were all from struggling alcoholics. They know how difficult the process of sobriety is and they use their words to paint a candid portrait of the reality of the struggle.

There are so many other forms of arts out there and we wholly suggest that you try to find out that fits your skills and your desires.

Volunteerism

43 - Staying Sober: 3 Activities That Can Help You Out

Helping others is a gift that is utterly priceless. Many of us volunteer at rehab centers and even alcoholic recovery groups. It really is quite fulfilling to utilize our own personal experiences and turn them into tools that can help other people.

Volunteerism not only keeps you busy but will also widen your network of friends and supporters. Every struggling alcoholic needs a good support network.

Moving Forward…

Getting sober is hard. Staying sober is a lot harder. We want you to know that we know exactly what you are going through and that you are not alone in your struggles. We hope that you will find an activity that keeps you well away from temptation and will keep you on the wagon so to speak.

What activities are you a part of that really helps you stay sober?

featured10 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal
Alcohol Addiction Sobriety

Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

One of the biggest hurdles facing recovering alcoholics would be withdrawal symptoms which can last for quite some time. Today, we wanted to discuss how recovering alcoholics can stay the course in the face of withdrawal.

Last time, we discussed a few of the common withdrawal symptoms. In today’s discussion, we want to share some of our personal tips on how you can stick to your quest for sobriety. For example:

Staying Hydrated

31 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms will wrack your body in ways that you could not imagine to feel. You will sweat, you will tremble, and you will probably expel most of your body’s fluids. Staying hydrated is a good way to keep your body healthy while in the midst of withdrawal.

Get Support

32 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

One of the biggest mistakes that a recovering alcoholic can do is to attempt weathering withdrawal symptoms alone. It is important that you are not alone while you go through the whole process of withdrawal. You will rant and rave and may even get physical just to get the pain to stop.

You need people you can trust and have your best interests at heart around you at this critical time. If you do not have any friends or family to help you, consider approaching an organization that prioritizes the well-beings of those who want to achieve sobriety.

Use That Cold Shower

33 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

A lot of people do not actually realize the power of a cold shower. When you are in the midst of the temptation to relapse or when you are in the middle of some pretty volatile withdrawal symptoms, a cold shower can be the swift dose of cold reality that can help you remember your goal.

The pain is only for now and the cold shower will help you with it.

Consider In-Patient Admission

34 - Powering Through: How You Can Stay the Course in the Face of Withdrawal

If you are not confident in your own capability to weather through withdrawal symptoms, you may want to consider going in for an in-patient admission at your local hospital or rehabilitation center. They are fully equipped and have staff that is trained to help address issues that recovering alcoholics will end up facing.

They can really help to keep you safe as you make the difficult trek toward continued sobriety.

Moving Forward…

Withdrawal symptoms are known to be highly uncomfortable and can be a physically—and mentally—jarring experience. There have been so many to give up at the first taste of pain following the decision to go sober. Yes, this is a highly difficult point in time but you must remember that the pain is temporary. A much better you and a much better form of existence awaits you in the realm of sobriety.

How did your withdrawal symptoms go? How did you manage to stay the course?

featured9 - Withdrawal Symptoms: Some Few Symptoms You Should Expect
Alcohol Addiction Sobriety

Withdrawal Symptoms: Some Few Symptoms You Should Expect

If you’ve decided to leave your bad habits, first off good on you! Today, we wanted to provide you with some information on some withdrawal symptoms you will probably face on your way to complete sobriety.

Withdrawal symptoms are physical and mental side-effects which come after the absence of a particular drug or addictive substance. This can happen to anyone who suddenly cut off the intake of anything which usually alters their natural state like nicotine, caffeine, pharmaceutical products, and alcohol.

For a recovering alcoholic, here are some of the more common withdrawal symptoms that can hit you:

Confusion

When someone has been imbibing a lot of alcohol through an extended period of time, the abuse starts to take a toll on their mental faculties. When alcohol has been stopped from entering your system, you may feel the effects through mental confusion.

This is because your body is trying to regain much of its old functions—this includes your brain. Old neurons that have not been active or have been damaged are now trying to function like normal.

Nausea and Vomiting

This is one of the more common symptoms of withdrawal symptoms. The duration can last from around a week to a month or two—it all depends on your physical state. When you are exhibiting these symptoms, it would be prudent for you to always replenish your body’s fluids with water.

Try to avoid any food that may aggravate your stomach or your throat on its way out. Most recovering alcoholics spend this duration of time in a hospital with a dextrose drip to keep their body’s hydration levels in safe regions.

Auditory and Visual Hallucinations

From a personal standpoint, this is the most frightening symptom that goes with the withdrawal phase. Auditory and visual hallucinations start at around six hours after the last drink and can last for quite a while.

Anyone who is trying to achieve sobriety on their own must take careful note of this period of time. We fully advise that you stay within a safe environment, along with people that you can trust to guard you. If you do not have anyone, we fully suggest that you obtain professional help in order to avoid doing harm to yourself and others.

Moving Forward…

If you have been rather consistent in your intake of alcohol, you need to know that your withdrawal symptoms may be more severe than you expect them to be. If you have been a long time alcoholic, you may want to consider going to a hospital so that doctors may be able to assist you with the gravity or severity of your withdrawal symptoms.

What withdrawal symptoms have you felt during your journey toward sobriety?

featured8 - What You Affect: Four Common Health Issues Attributed to Alcoholism
Alcohol Addiction Health

What You Affect: Four Common Health Issues Attributed to Alcoholism

If you’ve ever heard that imbibing copious amounts of alcohol is bad, they aren’t lying or stretching the truth. Alcohol can—and will—screw up the body’s natural system and processes. Today, we wanted to talk about some common health issues that are attributed to alcoholism.

Anemia

Any doctor will tell you that anemia refers to the state wherein your body is not producing enough red blood cells. Red blood cells are what carry oxygen to the different parts of your body. If you have been injured in your lifetime, you may notice that blood tends to clot. It is the red blood cells which are responsible for that occurrence.

Drinking too much, it ends up suppressing your body’s natural process of producing red blood cells. If you are anemic, you can end up feeling fatigued despite not doing anything strenuous and your body’s natural processes are hampered and slowed down.

Cirrhosis

All doctors will tell you that liver cirrhosis due to alcoholism is probably the most advanced sort of disease that can afflict one’s liver. For anyone who isn’t familiar with the function of the liver, you may want to focus on this. The liver is the organ which filters out any harmful toxins in our blood. The liver is also responsible for the deconstruction of proteins so that our body can use it.

If the liver sustains heavy damage because of excessive drinking, there is a chance that it will stop working entirely.

Memory Problems

Most people think that alcoholics develop memory problems because of the effects of the alcoholic substance itself. They erringly believe that those with drinking problems are always lost in the alcohol and that their memory—like everything else—seems slurred in the perspective of the alcoholic.

The truth is severe drinking problems can result in Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome. This is a brain issue which is the direct result of the lack of vitamin B1 and alcohol abuse.

Osteoporosis

A lot of people do not realize that excessive drinking actually affects bone health. This is particularly true for those that started drinking at a young age. If a person has an alcohol addiction problem, they severely increase their risk for osteoporosis.

Moving Forward…

Knowing what you risk with your body by keeping up regular alcohol binge sessions can help keep things in perspective. Knowing what your body can go through when you keep up your alcohol habit is one sobering thought. We hope that today’s discussion really helps to shine a light on why it pays to stay sober.

Have you felt any adverse effects with your drinking?

info3 - What You Affect: Four Common Health Issues Attributed to Alcoholism
Infographic by: acefitness.org
featured7 - Talking about Steps: Why a Routine Helps Stave Away Drinking Temptation
Recovery Sobriety

Talking about Steps: Why a Routine Helps Stave Away Drinking Temptation

In the journey towards complete and consistent sobriety, there are certain things that you can actively do to better your chances for it. You can go for therapy or group sessions. Personally, we like the simplicity and efficacy of routines.

What is a Routine?

A routine is a predetermined set of actions that is normally done day after day. As a child we were given routines to acclimatize us to stimulation and help us sleep. As children and teens, we had a steady schedule which included school or even a few extra curricular activities.

As adults, a routine is best to help maximize our time, effort, and money.

Why Does It Help?

An alcoholic is someone who has lost control over their impulses and their capability to contain their decisions. Having a routine can help for a variety of reasons. Reasons like:

Structure

21 - Talking about Steps: Why a Routine Helps Stave Away Drinking Temptation

Recovering alcoholics benefits from having structure. Any therapist will tell you that having structure is a key ingredient in staying sober. Structure provides comfort and a safe environment as they pick up their confidence.

Someone who has been in the throes of addiction will tell you that even the smallest tasks can seem overwhelming. Having routine can rebuild someone’s confidence at handling tasks and day to day events.

Keeps You Busy

22 - Talking about Steps: Why a Routine Helps Stave Away Drinking Temptation

Someone who has struggled with addiction will tell you that being idle is a nightmare. Having a routine ensures that the recovering person keeps away form any form of idleness that can drive them to drink. Having a routine means that you’ll have a better idea of what to do with your time.

You can even better plot your days to maximize your recovery and your wellness programs. It allows you to clarify what is important and keep you away from temptation and boredom.

Establish Goals

23 - Talking about Steps: Why a Routine Helps Stave Away Drinking Temptation

Having a routine helps a recovering person understand what they should aim to attain. Routines make it easier for people to set their goals. It provides a very realistic timeframe on what they are able to do versus what they want to do.

Keeping track of the progression of your recovery is a great boost to one’s confidence.

Moving Forward…

Having a routine is important for anyone that is trying to keep away from grabbing another drink. We all know that it is virtually impossible to completely remove temptation from one’s life. There will always be instances and people that may inadvertently give you access to alcohol. This is why having a routine heightens your chances of staying away from being tempted.

Do you have a routine? What sort of routine would you build for yourself?

featured6 - The Power of Therapy: Why Family Members of Alcoholics Need It
Alcohol Addiction Family

The Power of Therapy: Why Family Members of Alcoholics Need It

The biggest trouble with alcohol addiction is the fact that it does not just affect one life—it affects the lives of countless others. Today, we wanted to discuss therapy and why the family members of alcoholics need this as well. This may seem like an odd choice of topic given that our primary focus is obtaining sobriety.

Family plays a big part in the success of a recovering alcoholic so it would be critical for them to be in the right frame of mind. We are wholly invested in the success of those that struggle with alcoholism and we would like to boost their chances by providing them with an environment that is conducive to recovery. That environment includes their family.

If you have someone in your family that has been struggling with alcohol addiction, you may seriously want to consider getting therapy. This is because of a few good reasons, like:

Allows Better Understanding of the Situation

An alcoholic in the family is quite difficult—there’s no getting around that fact. They’re mercurial in their temper and can appear to be wholly selfish when in the midst of their binges. The difficult thing about it is the fact that they are not always that way. They have moments where they seemingly switch back into who they were before they developed an alcohol problem.

It can be confusing and frustrating and a great recipe for a volatile relationship. Going in for therapy can and will help you better understand the situation. You can better understand what you should do when in difficult situation.

Lessens Your Likelihood to be an Alcoholic

Studies have shown that it is those who were raised by alcoholics that have a higher percentile of being alcoholics themselves. This is because of the extreme duress, potential abuse, and the lack of a safe and healthy environment.

Going in for therapy can help you lessen your chances of becoming an alcoholic yourself. you gain a better understanding of yourself and you can sort out your own troubles which stem from your loved one’s alcoholism.

Moving Forward…

Therapy is useful and quite helpful in the midst of a difficult situation. Therapy can help you better understand your loved one and simultaneously protect your own well-being. Several of us were truly helped out by therapy. If you’re worried about the cost of it, there are organizations out there that provide therapy for the loved ones of alcoholics for free.

Do you have a loved one that’s an alcoholic? Would you consider going to therapy?

info2 - The Power of Therapy: Why Family Members of Alcoholics Need It
Infographic by: visual.ly
featured5 - More than Just One: Three Different Sorts of Binge Drinkers
Alcohol Addiction Recovery

More than Just One: Three Different Sorts of Binge Drinkers

In order to fully understand a problem like alcohol addiction, it would be important to understand different facets about it. Today, we want to look a little closer at the different types of binge drinkers. Binge drinking is defined as the inordinately excessive amount of alcohol intake within a short period of time.

Binge drinking is often one of the common habits of a struggling alcoholic. People often thought that there was a single type of binge drinker—after all, how many ways can people drink a ton of alcohol, right? As it turns out, it is the reason behind the binging that differentiates them from the rest. For example:

Conformist Drinker

The conformist drinker is one that drinks in order to fit into an idea or a visage that they think is worth adhering to. Have you ever seen ads of men in suits, enjoying a glass of brandy (or something else) after a hard day’s work? That ideal has been peddled for decades and has finally hit home with their audiences.

It’s not just this particular ad, as well. Social media has made it seem that partying hard with a bunch of friends or strangers and getting absolutely wasted is one that “everyone does” or at least, those who are ‘cool’ or ‘in’ do. Conformist drinkers drink in excess in order to fit this ideal because they believe this is something that everyone does.

De-Stress Drinker

Sadly, this type of binge drinker is one that is more common than we would like. Life is hard—this much is true. We face a lot of troubles, stress, and a seemingly unending train of hassle that we would really rather not remember.

Those that qualify for the “de-stress drinker” is one that tends to drown their sorrows in a glass of their chosen poison. These are usually the ones that end up needing to drink more and more and on a fairly regular basis.

Hedonistic Drinker

Hedonistic drinkers are those that consistently crave something different and pleasurable. A good example of this would be Chuck Bass from the show Gossip Girl. He was someone that had no real world problems but mostly spent his time trying to find something new to break the monotony of his existence.

Studies have found that hedonistic drinkers are usually divorced individuals with grown offspring and those that crave for something to set them apart from other people.

Moving Forward…

Understanding the different sorts of binge drinkers can help to better root out the source of the problem and obtain sobriety. There are other types of binge drinkers out there and it’s important to be aware of them.

What sort of binge drinkers are you aware of?

featured4 - The Power of Peers: How Support Groups Can Help Beat Alcoholism
Alcohol Addiction Recovery

The Power of Peers: How Support Groups Can Help Beat Alcoholism

In the quest for sobriety and sustained recovery, one of the options besides self-detox programs like the ones  https://synergydetox.com provides is that people go and join support groups and organizations. Today, we wanted to have a more comprehensive discussion regarding how they can help beat alcoholism.

Empathy

11 - The Power of Peers: How Support Groups Can Help Beat Alcoholism

If you are lucky enough to have a caring set of friends and a supportive family, you will not have to tackle alcoholism alone. The reality of the situation is that most alcoholics end up driving their friends and families away.

Support groups are able to provide organic and authentic empathy for its members. After all, only someone who either has gone through or is going through something completely similar would be able to provide complete understanding to what the recovering alcoholic is going through.

Accountability

12 - The Power of Peers: How Support Groups Can Help Beat Alcoholism

Support groups place a lot of emphasis on the accountability of its members for their decisions. They will usually pair members up with each other in order to support each other on the day-to-day happenings. They are often the one that they call when they feel the urge to drink again or there is something that is threatening the wellness program that they are on.

Most rehabilitation centers will partner up with support groups because they understand that sobriety is an ongoing process. You don’t just instantly recover after a stint at a rehab. The urge to drink will be something that will be present in every second of every day. This is why accountability is quite important for a recovering alcoholic.

Further Self-Understanding

13 - The Power of Peers: How Support Groups Can Help Beat Alcoholism

Support groups making empowering of their members as one of the primary directives of recovery. Drinking is often a symptom that has gone awry but not necessarily the problem itself. Drinking stems from another issue entirely and support groups intend to get to the heart of the problem.

It is through regular counseling sessions and countless talks with a support group partner that a breakthrough is achieved. Support groups provide a safe and judgment free space for people to truly reach a better level of self-understanding. Achieving this enables a stronger foundation to leave alcoholism behind.

Moving Forward…

The road to recovery can seem hard and dark—especially when you believe that you have to walk it alone. Support groups are a testament to the fact that recovering addicts and those who want to achieve sobriety are never alone in their quest. The power of peers is a strong one and should be harnessed by anyone who is thinking of breaking free of their addiction.

Do you have a support group? What do you think you can gain from them?

featured3 - Self Help: How You Can Aim for Sobriety on Your Own Terms
Self Help Sobriety

Self Help: How You Can Aim for Sobriety on Your Own Terms

When it comes to tackling alcohol addiction, most people believe that it is not something that one cannot battle on their own. While it may be difficult, it is not something that is impossible. Today, we wanted to discuss with you how you can aim for sobriety on your own terms.

By “your own terms” we’re not talking about signing up for rehab or going for therapy. We’ll be focusing on some ways you can try to achieve sobriety by yourself. There are a lot of different ways to go about it and these are the ones that we can personally vouch for:

Realizing Triggers

For a lot of people who drink to excess, the reason can be traced to something in their life like work, a place, family, friends, or even relationships. These are some of the common ‘excuses’ or reasons why people drink.

When you understand what triggers your urge to drink, you can take steps to actively avoid it.

Filling Your Time

A lot of the time those that make it a habit to drink tend to allot a certain time of day for it. A great way to stave off the addiction and the actual drinking is to fill your time with suitable alternative activities. For example, if you find yourself drinking mostly at night, find something else that you can do during that time.

You can book friends, pick up a hobby which requires your full attention, you can even schedule working out at this time or even meditation. Find one that works well with your schedule and your preferences. Keeping yourself occupied with activities lessens the likelihood of you staying away from the drink.

Read Up

One of the best things about a subject like alcohol addiction is that it is something that many people are invested in solving. It is either they experienced it themselves or someone they know or knew was an alcoholic.

Read books like A Drinking Life by author Pete Hamill. Discover other people’s journeys with alcoholism and how it affected their professions and life. You could also try reading Running with Scissors. The author, Augusten Burroughs, chronicles his mother’s mental illness and eventual addiction and how it affected his life. It also discusses Burroughs’ own foray into alcohol and drug usage.

There is nothing quite as sobering as reading about someone else’s struggle and subsequent end or redemption.

Learn the Power of NO

There will always be temptation in your life. Others may not even realize that they’re risking your wellbeing when they ask you out. You should learn to say “NO” even at the risk of offending other people. The power of the word NO will keep you on track toward recovery.

Moving Forward…

Some of us tried out the different methods mentioned above and met varying degrees of success. No matter what method you choose, it all depends on your will to change and leave alcohol behind. Before you choose a method, we highly suggest that you educate yourself and empower your choices. After all, everyone has their own preferences and capabilities. It would be best to choose a method that you think you would be able to handle well.

Did you try to combat alcoholism by yourself? What method did you choose?

featured2 - Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue
Alcohol Addiction Help

Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue

Once you have come to terms with the fact that there is a problem in your life, now would be the time to find the help that you need. Today, let’s look at some of the common options that alcoholics can pursue.

Rehabilitation Centers

1 - Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue

This is, without a doubt, the most well-known option for those who struggle with alcohol addiction. Rehabilitation centers are often partnered with hospitals because they know that sudden and drastic absence of alcohol can have some pretty adverse effects on the body, the mind, and on the alcoholic.

Rehab centers can cost a lot of money since there is usually a mandatory stay of at least 15-30 days. Rehab often involves doctors, therapy, and even medication. Rehab can either be voluntary or involuntary. The trouble with involuntary rehab is that most patients end up relapsing.

Support Groups

2 - Getting Help: Common Options that Alcoholics Can Pursue

If going through the whole official process isn’t something that you’re into, you can consider joining a support group or organization. The more famous one would be Alcoholic Anonymous (AA). AA is usually free and works more like a peer group which holds each other accountable for their choices and actions.

They have therapists and a program that can help struggling alcoholics to find their way to sobriety and “stay on the wagon” so to speak. The usually have a regularly scheduled meeting to keep everyone focused on their goals. The personal accountability that support groups have is better than someone who was just released from rehab and left to their own devices.

Moving Forward…

Getting help can seem to be quite difficult when it really isn’t. There are a lot of options out there for those that truly want to attain sobriety. First and foremost, you must commit yourself to it—only then will the options really work for you.

Do you know of other options for alcoholic wellness? What option did you pursue?

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